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Korean Honey Citron Tea ~ Yuja cha Chiffon Cake




Yuja cha is a Korean  traditional tea made from thinly sliced yuja or citron together with its peel and combined with honey and sugar.  It is usually served hot, after a meal or on its own and here it's one of the ingredients for this chiffon cake.  I adapted the recipe  from the blogs of   'Do what I like' and 'Anncoo Journal'. and tweaked the method and recipes a bit to suit my 23 cm chiffon cake pan. This cake is soft, light, cottony and the sweet smelling citron tea does enhance the flavour of our household's favourite range of cakes and that is ...... Chiffon cake.















 Recipe for Korean Honey Citron Tea ~ Yuja cha Chiffon Cake

Ingredients
(A)
5 egg yolks
1/4  tsp salt
30 gm sugar
5 Tbsp canola/corn oil
1.1/4 Tbsp Cointreau
(B)
120 gm honey citron tea
5 Tbsp boiling water
(C)
150 gm superfine flour
1.1/4 tsp baking powder
(D)
5 egg whites
50 gm vanilla/caster sugar
1/2 + 1/8 tsp cream of tartar

Method

Sift the flour with baking powder, set aside.
Before mixing the tea with the hot water, snip the citron peel into smaller pieces.
Add in the hot water, mix thoroughly.  Leave to cool.
Cream egg yolks, sugar, salt, cointreau and oil till creamy.
Add the tea mixture into the egg yolk mixture, mix thoroughly with a balloon whisk scraping
from the bottom and side of the mixing bowl.
Mix in the sifted flour mixture.
Sprinkle the cream of tartar into the egg whites and beat till foamy.
Add in the sugar in 3 batches and beat till stiff but not dry.
Pour in 1/2 half egg whites into the flour mixture, mix thoroughly with the whisk.
Mix in the balance egg whites till well combined.
Pour the batter into the ungreased 23 cm chiffon cake pan.  
Bang the pan slightly to release any air bubbles.
Place the pan on the lower of the oven and bake in a preheated oven @ 180 deg C for 15 mins. 
then lower the heat to 170 deg C and bake for another 25 mins.
Test with a skewer till it comes out clean.
Remove the cake from the oven and invert immediately onto a wire rack to cool completely.



I'm submitting this post to Weekend Herb Blogging # 337 hosted by

Comments

  1. Making me jealous only lah - knowing that I can't make so tall and nice chiffon cake? :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course you can, Chris! Practice makes perfect. You can always try with a small one first.

      Delete
  2. Ya lor - so may be I should consider doing a series of chiffons with different flavours! Unlike the old days, only pandan chiffon - so boring!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Chris. Experiment, that's the way to go and you'll be handsomely rewarded. Trust me!

      Delete
  3. Thank you so much for rhis entry on WHB ... I've learned a new thing! ...and this cake looks so soft and yummy! ...i hope i can find a good substitute in case i kind find proper yuja over here!
    Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Cheah, how I wish I can help myself to a piece of this extraordinary chiffon. Is this Korean tea available at our local supermart? Must check it out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, you can get it from Jusco (Ipoh) supermarket from the dept. that have lots of Japanese and Korean stuff.

      Delete
  5. It's the yuja flavour heavy enough to cover the cake? I bet the citron zest must be very tasty. Yumm...yumm...yummm....
    Hope you're enjoying the evening, Cheah.
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the citron zest does play a part on the flavour of the cake. You enjoy your weekend too, Kristy!

      Delete
  6. Beautiful looking cake
    Pale color which makes it quite and elegant cake
    Love it

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love chiffon cakes for the fact that they have less calories and also so soft and fluffy! delicious flavors!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, don't feel guilty if I have one piece too many!

      Delete
  8. Looks lovely and interesting flavour! Chiffon cake is one of my favourites!

    ReplyDelete
  9. sound light and must be full of yuzu aroma!

    ReplyDelete
  10. i like your idea of using cointreau..i would never thought of that with the honey citron but now seeing you adding that, it think it complements well. YOur chiffon are always so nice..i especially like the purple sweet potatoes that you baked last time.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This sounds really light and lovely. I love the texture of your cake and wager it is delicious. I hope you have a great day. Blessings...Mary

    ReplyDelete
  12. i have honey citron tea sitting in my fridge for the longest time
    now can make use of it :)
    the cake looks so good, Cheah :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. How did the other. Previous commenters baked when no oil amount was listed?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HI Alicia.... thanks for the alert. Have missed out the amount of oil in the recipe, it's 5 Tbsp corn oil or canola oil. Have edited the recipe.

      Delete

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