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Guinness Storehouse, Dublin




Guinness Storehouse is Ireland's No. 1 visitor attraction and a 'must see' should one ever visit Dublin.  More than a million people a year visit the home of Guinness.  
Also known as 'Black Stuff', 'Black Custard' and 'Irish Champagne', Guinness was born in the 18th century when water from the River Liffey, Ireland's river which flows through the centre of Dublin was too polluted to drink.  Guinness stout is made from water, barley, roast malt extract, hops and brewer's yeast.
Guinness Brewery is located at St. James's Gate and housed in an old fermentation plant and the story of the black stuff began 250 years ago.
We bought tickets for the 7-storey self-guided tour of the Guinness Storehouse to learn all about the world renowned Guinness Stout.  The tour ended with a complimentary pint of Guinness or a soft drink at the Gravity Bar.  When you arrive at the Gravity Bar, whichever way you turn, you will enjoy a breathtaking view of Dublin and a few of the sights to look out for.
I only managed to snap a few random pictures and wish to share them with you.





Guinness Flagship Retail Store houses the largest collection of Guinness memorabilia.




The harp, which serves as the Guinness logo is based on a famous 14th century Irish harp known as the "O'Neill" or 'Brian Boru" harp which is now preserved in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin. The harp device has been synonymous with Guinness since 1862 when it was used as a symbol on the first bottle lable for Guinness.  It was registered as a Guinness company trademark in 1876.  It is because of the harp trademark that Guinness named its first lager 'Harp' in 1960.


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