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Steamed Chinese Sausages with Arrowroot




This round, edible tuber, 'arrowroot', 'ngah gu or ci gu' which literally means 'benevolent mushroom' and also known as 'arrowhead', is eaten particularly during Chinese New Year.  It's got a very slight bitter taste, a starchy texture, almost like a potato but it's somewhat crunchier even when it's cooked.  You can make stews with it or even make into chips and in my opinion, they taste better than potato chips.
We only get to see this once a year just before the CNY season and they are imported from China.  Some people will 'grow' them weeks earlier.  Place them in a glass bowl or a container with some water and pebbles and they'll flourish  ......... makes a beautiful ornamental plant, very auspicious for Chinese New Year!







Arrowroot, sweet meat known as 'Kwai Far Yuk' and a pair of Tung Koon sausages.  They taste the same as the cylindrical type of Chinese sausages, 'Lap Cheong', except that these are fatter and shorter.



Peel off the skin of the arrowroot, slice them thinly.  Slice up the sausages and cut up the sweet meat.
Place them on top of the sliced arrowroot.



After steaming ..........   mmm ..... this plate of steamed Chinese sausages and arrowroot will pair nicely with rice.

Recipe for Steamed Chinese Sausages with Arrowroot

Ingredients
  • 50 gm Tung Koon Chinese sausages
  • 100 gm 'Kwai Far Yuk'
  • 200 gm arrowroot
Preparation
  1. Cut off the stem, peel and slice up the arrowroot, thinly.  Spread on plate.
  2. Slice up the sausages and cut up the sweet meat.
  3. Arrange these cut meat onto the bed of sliced arrowroot.
  4. Steam under rapidly boiling water for about 15 mins., or till the meat is translucent.
  5. Serve hot with rice.

Comments

  1. Never saw any arrowroot here....that makes my mouth water..

    ReplyDelete
  2. I don't think I ever tried arrowroot before :O

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have never eaten arrowroot, I used to grow them for CNY, this sounds very tasty!

    ReplyDelete
  4. My all time favourite dish! My mom used to cook only one to two dishes per meal daily and sometimes with soup, and that counts 3..when I was younger! With this, I can eat lots of white rice with just the leftover lard(G yao) with light soy sauce.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi
    Angie
    Oh, I didn't like it when I was younger but now have acquired the taste.

    Tigerfish
    Do you get it at your place? If so, try slicing them thinly and deep fry like chips, very tasty!

    3 hungry tummies
    Then you should try to cook it, it's nice. I will post another recipe with arrowroot. So stay tuned!

    My Little Space
    Oh, G yao with light soya sauce and crack in an egg, mix with rice, yum, yum.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Aha...now I see what arrowroot is. I always wonder how it looks like. Must be a very delicious dish with the CHinese sausages. Have not eaten these sausages for many, many years.

    ReplyDelete
  7. oh I never seen or had arrowroot before. Maybe I have but not know about it. Didn't even know it is a CNY dish :$

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi
    Mary
    Do they have these in East Malaysia? I suppose you can find these sausages from those Asian groceries in your place.

    penny
    Maybe you've eaten it before and like you said don't know what it was.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi
    RussellDMcveigh
    This is a very simple recipe .... chances of failure is very minimal!

    ReplyDelete

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