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Hock Chew Mee Shua



Hock Chew Mee Shua ~  also known as 'Mian Xian' in Chinese and 'Meen Seen' in Cantonese are thin salted noodles made from wheatflour .  Mee Shua which originated from Fujian, China can be prepared in many ways.  The most popular of all is the Ang Chiew Mee Shua which is mee shua cooked with Chinese red wine but I chose to prepare this differently ....... stir-fried.  Quick, easy and delicious.






This is another  tasty one-dish meal, a comfort food ........ slurp!

Recipe for Hock Chew Mee Shua

Ingredients

  • 200 gm pork/chicken fillet, cut into strips
  • 8 dried Chinese mushrooms, soaked, stemmed and cut into strips
  • 3 servings of mee shua
  • 2 pips garlic, chopped
  • 1.1/2 cups water
  • 1 tsp chicken granules
  • leafy vegetables of your choice
  • 2 tsp cornflour + 1 Tbsp water for thickening
  • Sesame seeds, lightly toasted (optional)
  • Chopped chillies  (optional)
Seasoning for meat
  • 2 tsp each of  light soya sauce and oyster sauce
  • 1 tsp each of sesame oil, sugar and seasalt
  • 1/2 tsp dark soya sauce
  • Dash of  pepper
Preparation
  1. Saute the chopped garlic with some oil till fragrant, toss in the meat and stir-fry till semi-cooked, add in the mushrooms, stir-fry.
  2. Add in the water and let it simmer till the meat is cooked through.
  3. Test for taste and add thickening.  Set aside.
  4. Heat up some water in a pot, add some slat and blanch the vegetables, drain and set aside.
  5. Bring the water to the boil, toss in the noodles, keep stirring for about a minute.  Strain and drain.
  6. Mix the cooked noodles into the meat mixture, ladle onto serving bowls.
  7. Garnish with the blanched vegetables and sprinkle on some sesame seeds and chopped chillies.
  8. Serve immediately.


I'm submitting this post to  Weekend Herb Blogging # 324  hosted by
Cristina from La Cucina di Cristina



Comments

  1. It looks very good. I like it.
    I've tried one of your recipe http://saveursetgourmandises-nadjibella.blogspot.com/2012/03/meat-floss-buns.html. Very good.
    See soon

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for dropping by and gee I'm glad that you've tried and like my recipe. Will hop over to your blog soon!

      Delete
  2. Cheah, I always thought it is very difficult to fry 'mee shua' because it is very soft after blanching. Now I know. Thanks for sharing this recipe :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Ann. This mee shua can be fried or cooked with soup, both also nice.

      Delete
  3. This is a very unique way of cooking mee suah, looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. Lyndsey, please do. It's just like another type of pasta.

      Delete
  5. hmm... interesting! hock chew mee sua is something new to me! I'm more accustomed to cooking the Amoy/Xiamen type which is thinner and more suited for soups! Will keep a look out for these the next time I'm at the supermarkets!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This type is a bit thicker than the normal one for soup.

      Delete
  6. Next time at the supermarket, I have to be more observant. I hope they are available cos I really want to try. I am noodle head! hehe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't think this particular type is available in the supermarkets. This is from Sitiawan.

      Delete
  7. This mee sua is a little thicker and best the way you prepared it. Looks really tasty!

    ReplyDelete
  8. It's past 11. I'm feeling hungry reading your post and looking at the mee sua!

    ReplyDelete
  9. this is real comfort food. Love the mushrooms and sesame! Make the meesua more tasty;)

    ReplyDelete
  10. I love mee suah, this looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wow...looks very delicious. I didn't know there's such a Hock Chew mee suah dish. Looks like my hubby doesn't know all his type of food...haha. But I do love the one in chicken soup and red rice wine...mmmm...soooo good! What other Hock Chew dish do you know? I need to learn...hehe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know much about Hock Chew food except for the Hock Chew fish balls, it's fish balls with minced pork or prawn filling. Nice too.

      Delete
  12. i dun like mee suan at all, but seem the way u cook so unique. Then i shud try it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wasn't a fan of mee suah before until I came across this homemade from Sitiawan. This is different, not too soft and gluey.

      Delete

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