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Chinatown and local food ~ Honolulu



Before we went shopping at Ala Moana Center, the biggest shopping mall in Hawaii, we stopped by U-Choice Inn for breakfast ......  
This is a food outlet along the same strip as Don Quijote, a Japanese supermarket which opens 24/7.

We were early and I was amazed with the huge variety of Chinese snacks, ranging from egg tarts, yam cakes, Chinese dumpling ~ 'Choong', pak tong kou, jian dui, hup toh sow and others.  I was surprised too that there was conversation going on at the kitchen in the back ....... the ladies were speaking in Cantonese! (Must be from the older generation)



Our breakfast  -  Manapua is actually our 'Pau' that came in 2 versions, pork and BBQ meat/'char siew'.  Egg tart and the yam cake. 





'Woo kok'.... yam puff.  The yam is thick but with little meat filling.

Now back to Ala Moana ....... live performance at the Ala Moana Centrestage at 1pm daily










Chinatown of Honolulu








These thorny fruits are Breadfruit aka 'Buah Sukun' in Malaysia.  They can be cut up and fried in a batter like 'Goreng Pisang' or Banana Fritters.


I was amused to see the pig head!
 

 After having some light lunch, we made our way out of the food court and I spotted this image of  Kuan Yin, the Goddess of  Mercy.


The famous Ying Leong Look Funn Factory.  Look Funn are flat rice noodles wrapped in a roll and here they have plain as well as with BBQ meat ~ char siew  or dried shrimps fillings.They are wholesalers and supply to many restaurants in Honolulu but do entertain individuals as well.   I don't understand why it's called 'Look Funn' as we refer to these flat rice noodles as 'Cheong Fun'.  


Leonard's Malasadas ~ A Portuguese doughnut covered with either regular sugar, li hing mui sugar or cinnamon sugar.  We bought them from this Malasadamobile located at Waikele Premium Outlet.





Comments

  1. Dear Cheah,

    Honolulu is a beautiful place and the seafood looks quite fresh but I think I will give that woo kok a miss LOL!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like the Japanese food there but at the same time also curious about what they eat locally.

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  2. Hi Cheah, I believe the fastest ways to understand the lifestyle and culture of the people of any place is to visit the local markets and try their food. Thanks for sharing.

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  3. I saw durians in the market and I love the two pics of the performance, very pretty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ann, those weren't durians and forgot to ask what they were.

      Delete
    2. HI AH Yee..those 'durian' looking fruits are what we call 'Buah Sukun' or otherwise known as Breadfuit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadfruit)

      Delete
    3. HI Ah Yee...

      Those 'durians' are actually Breadfruits also known a 'Buah Sukun' back in Malaysia. You can cut them up & fry them in batter like in 'Goreng Pisang".

      Delete
    4. Looks like Jackfruit.

      Delete
    5. Thank you so much for the information, Alvin.

      Delete
  4. Thanks for sharing. I like to visit local market whenever i visit to other countries.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that's where we can see how the locals live and the food they eat. Interesting.

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  5. i didnt know that hawaii is also another place where lots of chinese reside until i read that article you linked to..i am just as amused seeing that head of the pig:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lena, Chinese immigrants are all over the world. We had an interesting conversation with some local (born in Hawaii) Chinese uncles in the Chinatown foodcourt who can't speak Chinese and they were amazed that we are tri-lingual and can speak other Chinese dialects too. They said they did study some Chinese when they were young but upon returning home, no one to converse with them, so automatically they forgot. They guessed we were Singaporeans, HK, Koreans, Japanese, Taiwanese, China but never mentioned Malaysia!

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  6. Oh wow....looks like such a nice and fun place to visit. I would love to go one day. That Portuguese donut looks interesting. By the way, I love your new blog layout. I think it looks neat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Mary. You should go to Hawaii for a visit, a far cry from cold, cold, Aberdeen!

      Delete

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