Skip to main content
logo
Food Advertising by

Chicken Floss Rolls (Tangzhong method)


I made it and so glad that I've finally made it!   Yes, I've been able to make my bread using the Tangzhong method and credit should go to my breadmaker for helping me knead the wet and sticky dough till it doesn't stick to my hands and I can handle and mould to whatever shape that I fancy.  I had tried to knead the dough by hand using this method but it was too messy and sticky to hanlde and I had to keep on adding more bread flour to make it manageable.  I finally gave up and that was quite some time back.  But now since I can rely on my breadmaker to do the most difficult part of kneading the dough, I can continue to experiment with more shapes and flavour for my bread :)










This bread is indeed very soft and light just like those sold in the bakeries!

Recipe for Chicken Floss Roll (adapted from 'here')

Ingredients for Tangzhong

  • 25 gm high protein flour
  • 125 ml water
Ingredients for Dough
  • 210 gm high protein flour
  • 56 gm plain flour
  • 20 gm milk powder
  • 42 gm caster sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 6 gm yeast (1 tsp + 1.5 tsp)
  • 1/2 an egg, lightly beaten
  • 85 gm water
  • 84 gm tangzhong
  • 22 gm butter cut into pieces
  • Black sesame seeds + sunflower seeds (optional)
  • Egg wash
Filling
  • Chicken floss + oil or melted butter
Method  for Tangzhong
  1. Mix the flour with the water till free of lumps.  Cook on low heat, keep stirring till you can see the base of the pan and swirl lines after stirring.  Cover with cling wrap making sure that the cling wrap touches the tangzhong to prevent a dry layer from forming.  Cool in room temperature before chilling.
  2. Can keep refrigerated for 1 to 2 days.  Discard if the tangzhong has turned greyish in colour.
Method for Dough
  1. Put the ingredients into the pan of your breadmaker, adding the tangzhong together with the liquid ingredients, according to the instructions of your breadmaker.  Press the 'Dough Cycle'.  My breadmaker takes 1 hr. 30 mins. with kneading and the 1st proofing.
  2. Put your finger into the dough and if the indentation remains, then the dough is ready for shaping.
  3. Knock out some air from the dough, knead a while and do the Windowpane or Membrane test by taking a bit of dough and stretching it out with your fingers till very thin and transparent and it doesn't break.  If it breaks then the dough has not been kneaded enough and you'll knead it again for a few more mins.
  4. Divide the dough into 4 portions, roll into balls, cover with a damp cloth and let rest for 15 mins.
  5. Roll out a ball of dough to an oval shape, apply some oil or melted butter and sprinkle on some chicken floss.  Roll up like a swiss roll.  Repeat with the remaining balls of dough which have been covered with a damp cloth to prevent them from drying up.
  6. Place the dough into a greased loaf pan, cover with a damp cloth, put in a warm place and let prove again for about an hour or till double in size.
  7. Apply egg wash and sprinkle on some black sesame seeds and sunflower seeds.
  8. Bake in a preheated oven @ 170 deg.C for 20 to 25 mins. till golden brown.  Let cool in pan before removing the bread onto a wire rack to cool completely.


I'm submitting this post to  'Yeastspotting' 
and
to  'Internationl Yeasted Recipe' organised by Kristy of  'My Little Space'

Comments

  1. These bread rolls look super soft, Cheah. Love your bread basket.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Heavenly Cheah! I can only imagine how light and fluffy these rolls must be. I have never heard of Chicken Floss Rolls before this and now I must learn more about them. I would love to try this method but I don't have a bread machine any more. I gave it away, lol.... Thank you so much for sharing, Cheah...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Louise. Yes, we do have pork floss and chicken floss readily available here or you can DIY too!

      Delete
  3. Hi Cheah,

    I see that you managed to convert your blog to .com!!! HURRAY!!! Did you get help eventually? I know it is difficult because I can't do it :p

    Baking more to celebrate your successful transition! These floss bread look yummy!

    Zoe

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Cheah, having a breadmaker at home is certainly a great idea, esp here when the season changes like in winter the proofing process can take a long time. My breadmaker has broken for 6 mths already & still haven't bought a new one. Tangzhong method is very useful in making soft bread & like your rolls with the floss, my favourite.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, a breadmaker is a God sent! Without it I simply can't manage the Tangzhong method in breadmaking!

      Delete
  5. These rolls look fabulous! I know I wouldn't be able to make them, but I definitely would like to have one ;)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Your chicken floss rolls look soft and unique with the addition of sunflower seeds on top :) Have to agree with you that tangzhong method yields very soft bread but can be rather messy, i guess that's the price to pay huh.

    ReplyDelete
  7. These bread rolls sounds really yummy with the added chicken floss filling! I could chomp the whole loaf myself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I like these rolls with chicken floss too, Mel!

      Delete
  8. oh yes i love chicken floss.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Victoria Bakes said wet dough produces soft, moist and fluffy bread. Using the breadmaker to knead is good option, not laborious and messy. Very nice bread.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Kimmy. A breadmaker is a good investment, must admit!

      Delete
  10. Nice ! Love the texture as well. Wish we can have afternoon tea together right now. haha....
    Enjoy & have a lovely evening.
    Blessings, Kristy

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Cheah, I like your bread rolls. Look very soft. Also super like your pictures, very nice :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wow... I'm truly impressed, Sokehah! Bread looks super soft and sooo.. inviting.
    Love your new .com site too - clean and uncluttered... Congrats to you on the switch from blogspot and thumbs-up to your situ! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jacqueline. You're one of my teachers too!

      Delete
  13. They look so fluffy! Do you use fresh yeast?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for dropping by. I used instant dried yeast.

      Delete
  14. Cheah, I am organizing a brand new event called the 'International Yeasted Recipe' and hope to you will join in as well. And this recipe looks just perfect.
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kristy. May post another one before end March.

      Delete
  15. That looks so soft and fluffy, I like tangzhong method although sometimes lazy to cook it lol!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jeannie. Tangzhong method makes the bread light and soft.

      Delete
  16. Cheah, I am admiring your bread! I should really get into bread making.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Cheah, this bread looks so light and fluffy. I always love buns with chicken floss and yours is so beautiful and irresistible! Thanks for sharing and cheers :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Love the food shots! Bet it was flavourful! Have a wonderful weekend :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Shirley, still struggling with my camera!

      Delete
  19. Hi Cheah,
    I am reading your posts backward..lol
    Another lovely meat floss bread. I love bread in loaf. Is this in a small loaf?
    Meat floss with soft and fluffy bread, simply YUM!
    Again love your clicks very much!!
    mui

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the compliment. Yup, 4 small loaves in a loaf pan.

      Delete
  20. Hi. Thanks for the recipe. Im making this twice now. I like to add condensed milk to wet dough for milky tasting bread. I hand knead them, yummy soft bread! This one go to 'for keeps' recipe among others :). Ken

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're most welcome. Glad that you tried the recipe and like it. Adding condensed milk is also a good idea!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Thanks for dropping by. Please click on 'Anonymous' if you do not have a blog but do leave your name after the comment because I would like to know who you are.

Popular posts from this blog

Yoghurt Fruitcake

T is the festive season again and the all-time favourite for X'mas is undoubtedly the ubiquitous fruit cake.  This Yoghurt Fruitcake caught my eye when I was browsing through a Food and Travel magazine.  As I've never baked a fruit cake with yoghurt before, I was very eager to try. 

Overnight Almond Orange Muffins ~ 隔夜杏仁橘玛芬

  I stumbled upon this post on how to achieve "Tall Bakery Style Muffins'' from 'Handletheheat' blog which aroused my curiosity and I was very eager to give it a try.  The batter is chilled for a few hours or overnight and can be baked straightaway.   Thus the muffins can be baked in a jiffy and you can serve warm freshly baked muffins for breakfast.  Yes, I noticed that the muffins rose fairly high and they were fluffy and moist. Overnight Almond Orange Muffins  ~    隔夜杏仁橘玛芬 Ingredients 143 gm plain flour 30 gm caster sugar 30 gm brown sugar 1/8 tsp salt 1/2 Tbsp baking powder 1/2 cup buttermilk (add 1 tsp vinegar or lemon juice to make up 1/2 cup) 57 ml oil 1 large egg 2 tsp orange zest 1/2 tsp vanilla Almond slivers to sprinkle Method Sieve and whisk flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. In another mixing bowl, whisk egg, oil, vanilla and buttermilk. Pour the wet ingredients (2) into the dry ingredients.  Add in orange zest.  Mix till just combine and do not ov

Double Boiled Herbal Chicken Soup

Double boiling is slow cooking ........ means to put a soup pot or any covered ceramic or steel pot inside a bigger pot, immerse in boiling water, and let the soup cook at a lower temperature.  Hence the soup is cooked from heat generated from the boiling water and not from direct heat source. Double boiling lets the soup ingredients slowly release their nutrients into the soup, thus making it tasty and wholesome.  It's a long cooking process, roughly averaging 2 to 4 hours.  The tip is not to open the cover to check on the soup as it'll bring down the temperature and affect the cooking process.  The plus point is there's little evaporation and the soup will not boil over.  The only thing is to monitor that there's enough water in the bigger pot and not let it run dry.  Of course, nowadays, the slow cooker is another alternative to double boiling, saves the hassle of checking the water level.