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Steamed Tri-colour eggs aka Sam Wong Dan ~ 蒸三皇蛋


This simple, homey egg dish surprisingly is very often listed under 'egg dishes'  on the menu of many Chinese restaurants.  It may appear to be a very easy peasy dish with only eggs, water and salt but then to be able to achieve a silky smooth texture custard do require some fine tuning.   After two attempts I deduced that attention must be given to the amount of water added to get the correct consistency, heat and timing for steaming.






Silky smooth egg to go with a hot bowl of rice !


Steamed Tri-colour eggs aka Sam Wong Dan ~  蒸三皇蛋

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken egg
  • 1 salted egg
  • 1 century egg
  • Boiled and cooled water (ratio 1 : 1.5)
  • Sesame oil & chopped spring onions to garnish
**  Total volume of eggs is 100 ml so, I added in 150 ml water

Method
  1. Break up the chicken egg, add the salted egg white and beat well.
  2. Break up the raw salted egg yolk.
  3. Peel and cut up the  century egg.
  4. Add boiled and cooled water into the egg mixture, whisk.
  5. Mix in the salted egg bits and century egg.
  6. Pour onto a dish and scoop out the foam.
  7. Once water in the steamer is boiling rapidly, put in the dish, cover and lower the heat to the minimum.
  8. Steam for 14 to 15 mins. and occasionally lift up the lid to peep at the progress after 5 mins., then every 3 mins.
  9. Lightly jiggle the plate and if the centre is wobbly, then it is done.
  10. Turn off heat and remove the plate of eggs.
  11. Garnish with the chopped spring onions with a dash of sesame oil and pepper.
  12. Serve immediately.





Comments

  1. How I miss the century eggs!! This steamed egg looks really delicious, Cheah.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Cheah, thanks for sharing the recipe. I am drooling just looking at your dish. :)

    ReplyDelete

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