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Hup Toh Soh aka Chinese Walnut Biscuit ~ CNY 2010


This is another biscuit which I normally make for Chinese New Year, Hup Toh Soh,..... 'hup toh' is Cantonese for walnuts.  Traditionally, this biscuit is made with lard and without walnuts.  However, I've substituted lard with margarine and added in some slightly roasted walnuts, chopped,  for that extra flavour.  This is a crunchy, nutty biscuit, and it has always been a favourite amongst my family members!


Picture on the left.  Pinch off some dough to form into a ball, then slightly make a dent in the centre.  The size of the biscuit is your own personal preference.
Picture on the right.  Apply egg glaze onto the biscuits before putting them into the oven.  Space them about 3/4 inch apart.


Baked Hup Toh Sow ...... fresh from the oven, crispy, crunchy and delicious!  Ensure that they are completely cooled  before storing them in the cookie jar, they do keep well.





Enjoy these with a cup of hot Chinese tea to usher in the Lunar Chinese New Year on 14th February 2010, which incidentally is also Valentine's Day!


Recipe for Hup Toh Soh aka Chinese Walnut Biscuit

Ingredients
  • 150 gm margarine (Or use 110 to 120 ml of vegetable oil sparingly)
  • 250 gm self-raising flour
  • 80 gm caster sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 50 gm coarsely chopped slightly roasted walnuts  (optional)
  • 1 egg  beaten, for glazing
Method
  1. Sift the self-raising flour into a mixing bowl.
  2. Cut in the margarine, add in the sugar and the chopped walnuts. 
  3. Mix thoroughly till the dough does not stick onto the hands.
  4. Pinch off some dough and lightly form into a ball, make a small dent in the centre.  Place the biscuits onto a baking sheet, leaving some room between each biscuit.
  5. Brush them  with beaten egg wash.
  6. Bake in preheated oven @ 180 deg C for about 30 to 35 mins. or till golden brown.
  7. Cool completely before storing in cookie jar.
Note:  An update.  You can substitute margarine with vegetable oil, which will be around 110 to 120 ml.  You may or may not need all the oil.   Mix by hand till dough doesn't stick to your hands.




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