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Braised pork knuckle with mustard cabbage



Hi folks, I'm back from a most enjoyable vacation but as I need time to sort out the pictures taken during my holiday, I'll slot in this porky dish which I cooked before my trip.
Braised pork knucke with mustard cabbage or 'Gai choy chee sou' is a dish which I've tasted in one of the Chinese restaurants during the Chinese New Year and immediately fell in love with it. 'Gai choy' or mustard cabbage is an Asian vegetable, generally pickled, braised or used in soups and has a strong bitter taste.   I tried to replicate this dish at home and it was well received by my family members. 










Recipe for Braised pork knuckle with mustard cabbage

Ingredients



    • 1 kg pork knuckle, cut into chunks  
    • 1 kg gai choy
    • 10 dried chillies, soaked in hot water to soften
    • 7 pcs dried tamarind slices
    • 60 gm palm sugar or to taste
    • 1 tsp dark soya sauce
    • 2 tsp light soya sauce or to taste
    • Sea salt to taste

    Preparation
    1. Wash and blanch the pork knuckle in hot boiling water, drain, rinse and set aside.
    2. Shallow fry the blanched knuckle in a wok with some oil.  
    3. Add in water to cover the meat together with the tamarind skin, dried chillies, palm sugar and sauces and salt.  Once it boils, lower the heat, cover and let it simmer.
    4. Meanwhile, wash, cut up the vegetables and blanch them in hot boiling water to remove the bitter taste, drain and set aside.
    5. Once the meat is a bit soft, add in the blanched vegetables and let the meat and vegetables cook through.
    6. Test for taste, dish out and serve.







    I'm submitting this post to  Muhibbah Malaysian Monday hosted by Suresh of 3 Hungry Tummies


Comments

  1. Welcome back ... fully charged up! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Welcome back Cheah! Miss you very much!!
    My hubby loves mustard leaves and I'm going to cook this for him soon. Thanks for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If he likes mustard leaves then he'll enjoy this porky dish.

      Delete
  3. Hi Cheah, glad to see you again.

    This porky dish look delicious, I like the kai choi.

    Have a nice week ahead, regards.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad to be back again and you enjoy your weekend too!

      Delete
  4. Looks good. Hope you had a great break!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sounds delicious! Reminds me of the usual sour chap choy where you throw all the leftover meats inside and boil with veg and tamarind slices.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it's more or less the same taste except that it's pork knuckle and not leftover meat.

      Delete
  6. hi, you're back!! i also love this dish, my parents love it even more, we had it in a chinese rest, either soon fatt or the one near mun choong. Thanks for sharing!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had it in East Ocean in Menglembu. It was wonderful.

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  7. Wow! This is my favorite and also my second son's... two of us can finish the whole pot! Looks so delicious!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I love 'gai choy' very much, never fail to have this whenever I have economy rice for lunch.

      Delete
  8. Hi Cheah, welcome back. I love Kai Choi but was told this is a 'cooling' vegetable. My friend advised me to blanch it first before cooking to reduce the 'cooling' effect. Is this workable?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I blanched the vege to take out the bitter taste, whether it is to reduce the 'cooling effect', I really have no clue. But you take it once in a while, should be ok. My motto is to take everything and enjoy, in moderation!

      Delete
  9. Cheah, sounds like you've been really busy lately. This dish looks very interesting. I think my MIL will love it.
    Have a fabulous weekend.
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, busy with unpacking, washing, etc. So why not please your MIL with this dish!

      Delete
  10. i need more rice to with this braised pork, see also air liur come out, hehehe.. Where did you go? must be a fun trip!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had so much fun, unfortunately all good things must come to an end and too soon. You'll know where I've been in my upcoming posts!

      Delete
  11. This is one of the dishes which I really, really love! I can keep eating and drinking the soup. Glad that you shared this recipe. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  12. What a comforting dish you have there! Thanks for the delicious entry :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. This looks yummy and easy. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Welcome back! Wonderful to know that you had an enjoyable vacation. Love your dish. Need more rice :D

    ReplyDelete

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