Skip to main content
logo
Food Advertising by

Street food in Prague


That black animal looks like a wild boar to me.  We assume that the sausages were made from wild boar meat and pork. Sides will include bread and saukraut.  Seems sausages are a favourite take-away food in Prague.  Or you can have them then and there as you can see that the couple on the left are enjoying them. Lots of porky dish around here in Prague.  


This piglet was wrapped up in foil in the day (maybe marinated).  At night it was being roasted on a rotisserie.


More pork being roasted and sold here.... day market in the Old Town big square.



Trdelnik comes from trdlo, the wooden stake the cake is wrapped around for roasting which gives it its traditional hollow shape.  It is a flaky dessert rolled in nuts, cinnamon or other flavours, roasted over an open fire. It's crispy and caramelised on the outside, inside its soft and fluffy  with a bit of a smoky flavour.

********

This pretty lass is making Prague wafers and selling them at 1 Euro each.  Wafers are among the traditional 
Czech specialties which dates back to 1856 and Prague has its own original wafers called Prague wafers.
The Prague wafer is just two thin sheets of wafer held together with a mixture of hazelnuts, vanilla, cinnamon and sugar.  One can buy them fresh from street vendors, or get them from the supermarket or grocery store. 








I'll squeeze in pictures of  these two shops which were just opposite this wafer stall.








We stumbled upon this while walking around Old Town Square.  This Absinthe is 70% alcohol, certainly not for us!

I  do hope that you've enjoyed your tour of Prague with me as your 'guide', till then.....

Comments

  1. Lovely food! Looking forward to more!
    Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Yup, going to post two more. See you then!

      Delete
  2. The street foods look quite interesting. Are those sausages made from wild boar?
    Would love to try the waffles!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really don't know. But my children bought some to try but they didn't quite like it. I'd prefer the Trdelnik. The wafer is super thin, like biting into air and can't really taste the nutty filling. You can get them commercially packed from the supermarkets.

      Delete
  3. Everything 'roast'? Very suitable for my hubby as he is a meaty person :D

    ReplyDelete
  4. Cheah, this place I must visit! Lots of pork and sausages and I would be very happy hah! hah!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You like pork? Wait till you see my future posts.....

      Delete
  5. Dear Cheah,

    I have been told Prague is a beautiful city but didn't realise there is a vibrant street food scene as well. That suckling pig looks awesome.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, a lot of pork and pork knuckle. Prague is indeed a beautiful place to visit.

      Delete
  6. It was a fun trip post. I wish I was there. I think I'm going to love their foods.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Cheah, I;ve missed out most of your travelling post. But just noticed those kurtos-kalac ! Did you try those cake? I made them before and was wondering how's the real one taste like! Looks so mouthwatering.
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, we ate them. Very nice, crispy. It's quite common there.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Thanks for dropping by. Please click on 'Anonymous' if you do not have a blog but do leave your name after the comment because I would like to know who you are.

Popular posts from this blog

Scallion Oil Chicken ~ 葱油鸡

From Spring Onion pancake , I'm sharing with you a Scallion or Spring onion chicken dish today.  This is more or less like a poached chicken dish except that it's laden with a sauce of scallion oil, chicken broth and Chinese wine.  This dish can be served as it is or chilled in the fridge before serving, Scallion Oil Chicken ~   葱油鸡 Ingredients 2 whole leg chicken, approx 600 gm 4 to 5 stalks of spring onions Ginger, sliced and minced 1 Tbsp Shaoxing wine 6 Tbsp vegetable oil Light soya sauce, salt and a bit of sugar to taste Method Season the chicken with some salt, set aside. Cut out the spring onion bulbs, some to put in the pot and some to make the oil. Chop up the rest of the green part of spring onions. Add the minced ginger into the chopped spring onions, add some salt, mix well. Bring some water to the boil, just enough to cover the chicken, add in the spring onion bulb d three slices of ginger and a teaspoon of salt. Once boiling,

Puff Pastry Egg Tarts - 2 酥皮蛋撻

I took the opportunity to try my hands at making puff pastry from scratch when I was on vacation as the weather was quite cooling and I assumed that the dough wouldn't be sticky and messy to handle. I could make both oil and water dough easily and there were no 'sweat and tears', LOL!  The pastries turned out nice and flaky and everybody gave their thumbs up for this dim sum, especially my dear grandnephew who asked for more! Oil dough - Sieve the plain flour into a mixing bowl, add in the cold, cubed butter, mash with a fork and slowly combine to form a soft dough.  Wrap up with clingwrap and keep in the fridge for 30 mins.  (You can do this with a food processor if you wish), Water dough - Sieve the plain flour into a mixing bowl, add in the slightly  beaten egg yolks, mix well, add ice cold water gradually ,( you may not require the whole amount of water as too much water can make the pastry tough), mix well and form into a dough.  Wrap up with clingwr

Herbal Jelly ~ Gui Ling Gao

H erbal Jelly ~ Gui Ling Ga o literally translated means 'Tortoise Jelly' is one of my family's favourite desserts.  It's much more economical to prepare this at home for you'll need to fork out between Rm 9 to Rm 11 for a bowl of this cooling dessert in any of those herbal tea outlets.  This soothing jelly, served chilled, is supposed to be able to help reduce our body heat, helps to get rid of toxins and is believed to be good for the skin thus culminating a healthier complexion.