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Water Chestnut Sweet Soup ~ 馬蹄羹


'Ma Tai Kang' in Cantonese or Water Chestnut Sweet Soup is one of my favourite dessert and I never fail to order this whenever I dine out.  This goes very well with Shanghai pancakes but is equally refreshing consuming it on its own.   Water Chestnut is not a nut but an aquatic vegetable with long slender stems growing above water from a bulb beneath that stores food for the plant.  The bulb is the water chestnut that we are referring to.  Water Chestnut is highly nutritious with a good source of potassium, vitamin B6 and manganese.  The distinctive characteristic of this aquatic vegetable is that it stays crunchy even after being cooked or canned and it's low in calorie and fat-free.






Recipe for Water Chestnut Sweet Soup ~  

Ingredients      

  • 10 peeled water chestnut
  • 100 gm rock sugar or slab/piece sugar  ( I used rock sugar)
  • 1 Tbsp water chestnut powder +  1 Tbsp water to mix
  • 1 litre water
  • 1 egg white lightly beaten
  • Pandan leaves
Method
  1. Peel, rinse, smash and chop up the water chestnuts, set aside.
  2. Mix the water chestnut powder with water, set aside.
  3. In a pot, dissolve the sugar with a litre of water and some pandan leaves on medium heat, add in the chopped water chestnuts.
  4. Keep stirring, bring to a light boil, lower heat.
  5. Mix in the water chestnut powder mixture, keep stirring on low heat, bring to a light boil.
  6. Switch off heat and slowly add in the beaten egg white, keep stirring.
  7. Ladle onto serving bowls.
  8. Serve warm or chilled.
Note :
  1. If a thicker consistency is preferred, use 2 Tbsp of Water chestnut powder + 2 Tbsp of water to mix.





 I'm submitting this post to the Best Recipes for Everyone, May 2015 Event
(Theme :  My Favourite Desserts)  organized by Fion of XuanHom's Mom and
co-hosted by  Aunty Young

Comments

  1. This is also my favourite dessert when eating out or at home. I cook the same way like you did but without the chestnut powder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Think it'll taste the same,just that it's not thick.

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Yes, chilled on a hot day and hot in winter :)

      Delete
  3. Hi Cheh,
    I love this Ma Tai Kamg too.
    I like the crunchiness and sweetness of the water chestnuts, yum yum. I think a bowl might not enough, heh. .....heh......
    Thank you for linking to BREE.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're more than welcome. I'll wallop 2 bowls at one go!

      Delete
  4. This is also my favourite dessert. Yours look so good! :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oo..what a great treat! I would love to try this one day! ^.^

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should..It's very refreshing, taken hot or chilled!

      Delete
  6. I've yet to try this soup out,I love water chestnuts, sure this will be my favourite

    ReplyDelete

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