Skip to main content

'Nam Yue' Rolls


I've been putting off making these 'Nam Yue' pau for quite some time but finally got down to it.  Instead of pleating the folds of the pau, this time I chose to just roll it up for a change, hence 'Nam Yue' rolls.  For those readers who do not have an idea of what 'nam yue' is, do check it out  'here'.












As you can see, I didn't make the meat too moist with more sauce as I was afraid that the gravy will ooze out from the ends, upon steaming.

Ingredients for Pau skin
  • 500 gm pau flour
  • 2.1/2  tsp dried yeast
  • 100ml lukewarm water 
  • 125 gm sugar
  • 5  tsp shortening
  • 2.1/8  tsp baking powder
  • 1/4  tsp salt
Filling
  • 370 gm pork fillet cut to 1/2 inch slice
  • 1  tsp nam yue/ preserved beancurd, smashed
  • 1  tsp each of light soya sauce and Shaoxing wine
  • 6 pips garlic, crushed
  • 2  tsp sugar
  • 1/8  tsp dark soya sauce
  • 1/2  cup water
  • 1/2  tsp cornflour + 2 tsp water to thicken
Preparation
  1. Marinate the pork fillet with the smashed nam yue for a few hours.
  2. Heat up a pan and saute the crushed garlic with some oil till fragrant.
  3. Mix in the marinated meat, stir-fry and add in all the sauces and sugar.
  4. Add in the water and let it simmer till the meat is cooked.
  5. Test for taste and stir in the cornflour thickening.
  6. Let cool and keep refrigerated till ready for use.  (Best to make this overnight).
Method
  1. Mix dried yeast with lukewarm water, stir.
  2. Add in 130 gm sifted pau flour, mix well.  Roughly make into a ball of dough and set aside for 15 mins.   (A)
  3. Mix the balance 370 gm sifted pau flour with the baking powder, sguar and salt.  (B)
  4. Pour (B) into (A).
  5. Add in shortening and water sparingly, knead till dough doesn't stick to the hands.  If the dough is too dry, add in 1 tsp of water.
  6. Cover dough with a damp cloth and let dough prove till double in size for about an hour, in a warm place.
  7. Knock out dough, knead for some time.  Roll out onto a slightly floured surface.  Weigh out about 50 gm of dough.
  8. Roll out into an oblong, put in the cooked meat and roll up like a swiss roll.
  9. Place the  roll on a piece of greaseproof paper, repeat process for the others.  Cover rolls  with a damp cloth and let rise for another 15 mins.
  10. Steam rolls under rapidly boiling water for 10 - 12 mins. and be very quick when removing the cover of the steamer, taking care not to let the condensed water drip onto the rolls.
  11. Remove from steamer and serve warm.




I'm submitting this to  Muhibah Malaysian Monday.  Do check it out  'here'.

Comments

  1. Wah, looks very "jeng".
    I heard the best is found in Menglembu, right?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Looks so white and puffy! I would prefer with more sauce though, maybe do the covered version to get the sauce sealed in huh?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Looks nice and soft. I love to have the sauce too!

    ReplyDelete
  4. so cool that you can make your own bao!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Cheah...this is like what Wendy said " jeng " LOL ! My Jo loves this and never fails to order this from the stall :) Thanks for sharing the recipe. Shall try it out one day when she is back :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. wish i can have one for my afternoon tea now, look so yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Whoa Cheah, the bun looks so white & fluffy. Like cotton soft! So pretty. I shall try making some savoury buns some day. You have just tempted me to do so. ha... Thanks for sharing. Have a lovely evening.
    Goodnight,
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
  8. What a great idea to make a rolled shape. Looks so elegant too. I don't think I've ever eaten this style of pork before (or maybe I just didn't know what it was called) :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Wendy
    Thanks. Not sure about Menglembu because I hardly go there.

    Jeannie
    Yes, that way the sauce won't ooze out.

    Rebecca
    Of course you can. More than welcome!

    busygran
    Yup I agree with you too but then I just thought of making something different to post on my blog.

    Penny
    You can do it too. I made the pau with the Rooster brand Vietnamese flour in Melbourne, turned out ok. No need to add in so much vinegar to the boiling water, less than half of what was stated is good enough.

    Elin
    Hey you can make good pau too, momsie!

    Sonia
    That's a nice picture, gosh so young! You too are welcome to partake the pau.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Very clever Cheah.. u did it again!

    ReplyDelete
  11. nam yue pau is very tasty and i think your pau really looks fluffy..long time never make pau already

    ReplyDelete
  12. Your boas are so professional made. Their texture is so soft...Yum!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Claire
    Thanks for sweet compliment!

    Lena
    Maybe it's high time you make for your girls, i.e. if they like pau.

    Zoe
    When I was in Melbourne I made pau with the Rooster brand Vietnamese pau flour and the result was good. Perhaps you can check it out. Caution though, don't add so much vinegar into the boiling water for steaming the pau.

    ReplyDelete
  14. the texture looks so soft, wish to have a big bite now.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Jess
    You are more than welcome to try!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Wow I want to just grab a few off the screen! They look so wonderful!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for dropping by. Please click on 'Anonymous' if you do not have a blog but do leave your name after the comment because I would like to know who you are.

Popular posts from this blog

Herbal Jelly ~ Gui Ling Gao

H erbal Jelly ~ Gui Ling Ga o literally translated means 'Tortoise Jelly' is one of my family's favourite desserts.  It's much more economical to prepare this at home for you'll need to fork out between Rm 9 to Rm 11 for a bowl of this cooling dessert in any of those herbal tea outlets.  This soothing jelly, served chilled, is supposed to be able to help reduce our body heat, helps to get rid of toxins and is believed to be good for the skin thus culminating a healthier complexion.

Braised Pork Belly with Mui Choy ~ 梅菜焖五花肉

Mui Choy is preserved mustard greens and there are two types, one is salty while the other is sweet.  There are many ways of cooking mui choy with pork belly.  Instead of braising, you can steam it with minced pork but here I am using only the sweet mui choy and I braised the pork belly with it.  This is a flavourful dish and you can serve it with plain rice or plain porridge. Braised Pork Belly with Mui Choy   ~    梅菜焖五花肉 Ingredients  400 gm pork belly cut into bite size 100 gm  preserved sweet mui choy 3 cloves of garlic 2 slices ginger Seasoning for the pork belly 1 Tbsp dark soya sauce 1/4 Tbsp sugar 1/4 Tbsp sesame oil 1/4 Tbsp oyster sauce 1/2 tsp pepper 1/8 tsp light soya sauce Method Season the pork belly for about an hour or more.  Set aside. Soak the mui choy for 45 mins., rinse and squeeze dry.  Cut into slices Heat some oil in the wok, fry the mui choy.  Add in the ginger slices.  Stir-fry. Add in the pork  belly, fry for a while and

Eel soup

This is an ABC soup with a difference.  Yes, there's fish in this soup ..... added a block of eel in it.  Curiosity was what prompted me to cook this soup.  I asked the fishmonger what is the best way to prepare this fish and he said that this eel makes a very tasty soup and I can't agree  more! Sweet and tasty soup with no fishy smell at all! Recipe for Eel Soup Ingredients 350 gm eel 2 carrots, cut into cubes 2 tomatoes,cut into wedges 3 onions, cut into wedges 2.5 lt of water 20  white peppercorns, crushed Seasalt to taste Method Clean up the fish, set aside. Put the water into a pot, bring to a boil and add in the carrots, tomatoes, onions and peppercorns. Simmer for a while and add in the eel. Cover, lower the heat to medium low and let the soup simmer for about 1.1/2 hours. Add salt to taste. Ladle and serve immediately. I'm sharing this recipe with  Recipe Box # 30  hosted by Bizzy Bakes