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Red bean lotus root soup


It's the norm that we always associate red beans with desserts, mooncakes, sweet pastries or 'tong sui.  Well
it didn't occur to me that they also make a good soup ingredient, savoury that is, until I had my first taste of red bean in a soup when I was dining out in Melbourne.  Now, here's my version of adding red beans in this 'Red bean, lotus root and pig tail soup'.




These were the ingredients that went into the cooking pot besides the tail end bones of the pig.  Lotus root from China, fish bones, red beans and preserved sugarless dates aka 'Mut choe'.




Yummy soup that can be served anytime of the day, or just as a snack ......

Ingredients
  • 550 gm tail  end of pig and some ribs, chopped
  • 400 gm China lotus root
  • 90 gm red beans, washed
  • 3 sugarless preserved dates, washed
  • 2 pices fish bones
  • 10 cups water
  • Salt to taste
Preparation
  1. Wash the pork ribs and tail pieces, scald them in a pot of  boiling water to remove scum.  Take out, rinse in running water, drain.
  2. Peel and cut up the lotus root.
  3. Bring to the boil 10 cups of water, once boiling, add in the preserved dates, lotus root, red beans, fish bones, pork ribs and tail pieces.
  4. Boil on medium low heat for 2.1/2 hours till the meat is tender.
  5. Add salt to taste.
  6. Dish out and serve hot.

Comments

  1. though i dont eat pork but the soup look so nourishing and good! (:

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  2. hey cheah, a savoury red bean soup! i never had that before! thanks for sharing

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  3. Liang tong.. i never do red beans soup but black beans.. good idea!

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  4. The Sweetylicious
    Since you don't takr pork, you can substitute with chicken.

    Lena
    You try out and see whether you like it or not.

    Claire
    It was my first time too when I had it.

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  5. I haven't tried lotus sounds interesting red bean is my fav so i should give it a try :)

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  6. Read beans in savoury soups is interesting! Have to try this!

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  7. Has no doubt at all to add in red beans into soup. I love red beans savory machang too. Yet still not many tried it before. It's such an incredible combination. I'm sure your soup tasted special unique as well. Have a great day.
    Best regards,
    Kristy

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  8. Cheah, I'm sure you've been busy too for the past 2 weeks. Visiting all the encestors' grave yards. How's your day in Merlimau?

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  9. Whenever my mom prepared this, I would have finished all the lotus root first :-))

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  10. This soup sounds very interesting with the addition of red beans, never tried it as a savoury before. I have been craving and thinking about lotus root soup a lot lately. My mum used to make it with pork bone (I think it was ribs), and peanuts. One of my favourite soups. Need to go hunt down some lotus root...:)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Ananda
    I quite like the taste when I had it the first time, so I 'copycat'!

    pigpigscorner
    Ya, no harm trying!

    Kristy
    Had Qing Ming last weekend, this weekend is Ipoh do!

    Angie
    Me too, I'll attack the lotus roots first!

    Jay
    May sound weird to you, but no harm in trying!

    Shaz
    Lotus root must be pretty expensive in your place. Get the bones for soup, they'll do.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Red bean lotus Soup?

    Must Try it out sometime.
    Great Recipe!

    Papacheong
    http://home-cook-dishes-for-family.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. Mossycheong
    Thanks for dropping by. Yes, give this recipe a shot. Will hop over to your blog soon!

    ReplyDelete
  14. My mom used to boil Red Bean soup with Lei Yue. Said to heal bad boils. My brother had some bad boils when he was a toddler and drank this soup twice and was healed. Next time I want to try your version, sounds yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  15. wendy
    Soup with fish? Never had before and lei yue has a very strong fishy smell. I remember my dad loved lei yue braised with garlic and none of us will touch that dish.

    ReplyDelete

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