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Coconut konnyaku jelly


One of the key ingredients of   Konnyaku,   a traditional Japanese health food is flour derived from a taro/yam plant.  This is mixed with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide extracted from eggshells.  This yam plant known as konjac, Devil's tongue  or elephant yam is grown in the mountains of  Japan and also in Indonesia.
Konnyaku is a very low calorie food, virtually zero as it contains 97% water and 3% fibre  in the form of a viscous substance called glucomannan.  It  has traces of protein, starch, calcium and also rich in vitamin C.
Although low in calorie, it's  high in fibre, non-fat and is good for weight reduction as it's very filling.  It also helps in the cleansing of toxin in the intestines, normalises the cholesterol and sugar level and prevents high blood pressure.
Konnyaku on its own tastes rather bland.  It is gelatinous, firm and chewy and takes on the flavour of whatever it's cooked in.
A word of caution 
Jelly products containing konnayku may pose choking hazards as they can get stuck in the throats. Thus it's not suitable  to serve this to children below 4 years of age and to the elderly.  It is highly recommended therefore, to cut the jelly into smaller pieces and chewed properly before swallowing.






Konnyaku jelly with young coconut flesh


This one is topped with jackfruit.
Recipe for Coconut konnyaku jelly
Ingredients

1 packet (250 gm) of plain Konnyaku jelly powder
Fresh young coconut water + coconut flesh
Fresh jackfruit

Preparation   (As per instructions)

Pour 1 packet of  Konnyaku jelly powder into a pot.
Add in 1250 ml fresh coconut water into the pot slowly.  Using a hand whisk, stir continously to prevent the mixture from becoming lumpy.  Bring the mixture to a boil, then switch to low flame and
stir for another 3 mins.  Turn off flame and add in the enclosed
packet of malic acid and stir till dissolved.  Place cut coconut
flesh into the moulds.  Pour the mixture into the moulds until full.
Allow jelly to set before placing into the refrigerator.  For best result, leave the jelly in the refrigerator overnight.
Remove from moulds and serve.



Note :  Various fruit flavoured konnyaku jelly powder is also available and you can add in any type of canned or fresh fruits of your choice.
      

I'm linking this post to  Weekend Herb Blogging  hosted by  Anh of  A Food Lover's Journey.

Comments

  1. actually i still prefer the normal agar-agar's texture, as this is a bit chewy.

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  2. These look beautiful...I'll bet they taste as good as they look!

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  3. These jelly has lots of topical and style in them. They must be very refreshing when consumed at hot summery days.

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  4. My family loves this cooling and refreshing jelly. I'm want to make this too :)

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  5. I like konnyaku but I don't know if I have tasted konnyaku jelly. From your description, I may have eaten it without realizing it is konnyaku jelly. I love the fresh young coconut and jackfruit you put in it. It looks delicious!!

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  6. Cheah...I just make mango ones for the sunday schoold kids ranging from age 7 - 12 :p and they wallop them up in 1/2 hour. I make them thinner using Gertrude's seashell mould so they won't get choke on them :) Thanks for the info about them stuck in the throat. I will not make these for the younger ones then.

    For me, I love the chewy texture and the plus points of these jelly :)

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  7. Mmmm....love this. My girl would go crazy over these. I still have a few packets brought back from home. have to cook them again. Hope you have a great day.

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  8. Thats unique! I've never heard of this ingredient.

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  9. I think i wanna make some again one of these days!

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  10. cheha, such brilliant idea to use coconut flesh and coconut water!

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  11. Cheah, you're making salivate! These are perfect for this kind of bad weather.
    Have a lovely evening.
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
  12. Sonia
    I like it because it's chewy. There you are, one man's meat another man's poison!

    Lyndsey
    Thank you.

    Zoe
    Oh yes, just what we need in this hot weather.

    Anncoo
    Oh, so I'll keep a lookout for your post on this.

    Wendy
    Really? But it does take quite a bit of chewing.

    Biren
    I'm sure you must have. I like the taste of the coconut in this jelly .... cooling.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I nearly bought this packet of konnyaku jelly recently but put it back lol! now regretting after seeing your lovely jellies here.

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  14. Elin
    I too need to chew it properly before swallowing ... definitely not for the toddlers!

    MaryMoh
    Better cook them before they expire. You have a great weekend too!

    Shirley
    It's nice, chewy, texture not so bland as ordinary agar agar powder.

    Claire
    I'm sure you can handle this, super easy.

    Lena
    Thank you, thank you!

    Kristy
    Yes, we need this in this crazy weather.

    Jeannie
    I'm sure you can go get it again and start making straightaway this weekend.

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  15. Greetings. This is my first time on your blog, but you have a terrific one. I am always on the look out for new blogs, new ideas. I especially appreciate all the details you do, so many photos makes it seem like anyone can replicate the recipe!

    I am asking, would you please consider posting a few of your favorite recipes on erecipecards.com
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    It is a tool for bloggers to see and to be seen. Your posts would fit in perfectly.

    in addition, all photos, recipe titles as well as your blog name would link directly back to your blog. Thus giving you new attention and potentially new readers.

    Or, if you just want to take a look at a lot of fellow food bloggers all in one place. A great learning experience to get ideas about how to establish your own blogging voice!


    Please take a look. If you have any ideas or questions, please do not hesitate to write

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    ReplyDelete
  16. Penny
    Thank you. Hope you're feeling better now!

    ReplyDelete
  17. i made this jelly , but i love it.

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  18. I really need a recipe for Japanese fruit jellies using pure konjac flour. Have found many noodle recipes but none work. I have konjac flour and calcium hydroxide.
    Tailith

    ReplyDelete

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