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Pineapple Tarts ~黄梨塔 CNY 2015



Pineapple Tarts are available throughout the year in Malaysia and Singapore but they are most sought after and popular during the Lunar Chinese New Year.   They are a common sight in most Chinese households because it's symbolic to have Pineapple Tarts during this time of the year.  'Wong lai' in Cantonese and 'Ong lai' in Hokkien phonetically sounds like 'good luck comes'.  Hence, eating this cookie will thus bring forth good luck and prosperity.

This is not the melt-in-the-mouth type of pastry, it's crisp when fresh and will stay good even after being kept for some time.  You can also view my  other recipes on  Nastar and closed Pineapple Tarts from  'here' and 'here'.





Pineapple Tarts - 黄梨塔    (adapted from 'here')

Ingredients

  • 100 gm unsalted butter
  • 200 gm plain flour, sifted
  • 60 gm icing sugar, sifted
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 Tbsp milk
  • a pinch of salt
  • pineapple paste
Method
  1. Sift flour with salt, set aside.
  2. With a handheld whisk, beat butter with icing sugar till creamy.
  3. Add in egg yolk, mix well.
  4. Add milk and fold in the sifted flour.
  5. Mix to a smooth dough using a spatula.  Do not knead.
  6. Cover with cling wrap and let rest for 15 mins.  (If too soft to handle, chill in the fridge).
  7. Pinch about 10 gm of dough, flatten, put in some pineapple paste, roll up to whatever shape that you fancy.  Lightly slit the surface with a sharp knife to form a pattern.
  8. Bake in a preheated oven @ 180 deg.C for 15 to 18 mins. till slightly golden brown.
  9. Yield :  27 Pineapple Tarts





 I'm linking this post to Best Recipes for Everyone Jan. & Feb.2015 Event:  Theme
My Homemade Cookies by Fion of  XuanHom's Mom and co-hosted by
Victoria of  Baking Into The Ether
also to
'My Treasured Recipes #5 - Chinese New Year Goodies (Jan/Feb 2015)' hosted by
Miss B of  Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by
Charmaine of  Mimi Bakery House

and to




Cook and Celebrate : CNY 2015, Yen from Eat your Heart Out,
Diana from Domestic Goddess Wannabe and Zoe from  Bake for Happy Kids




Comments

  1. These pineapple pastries are so festive and pretty, Cheah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Angie. Have been making Pineapple Tarts each year, have run out of ideas of shaping them!

      Delete
  2. Hi Cheah,

    Your pineapple tarts look lovely. Do you wish to link your post with us for our Chinese New Year event, http://www.bakeforhappykids.com/2015/02/hakka-yam-abacus-plus-us160-paypal-cash.html?

    Zoe

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hah! So that's the reason many of my friends are making pineapple tarts. Thank you for sharing that bit about 'ong lai'. ^.^

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha, ha, everyone is looking forward to an 'ong' year, that's why!

      Delete
  4. thee are soo cute... looks like a mini hot dog bite when you bite, then stare at the filling.. am sure i will enjoy these little ones..

    thanks so much for your continuous support at Best Recipes :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're most welcome, Victoria. A mini hot dog .... good comparison :D

      Delete
  5. They look so good! I would love to grab one :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a pity that you're not in this part of the globe!

      Delete
  6. Yummy pineapple Tarts,look gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Cheah, Pineapple Tarts are what I look forwards to when going visiting during CNY :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Cheah, I've been seeing pineapple tarts everywhere but your pineapple shaping is the best. Look pretty!

    ReplyDelete
  9. So nice!! Sokehah I love your cookies :D

    ReplyDelete
  10. I like all sorts of pineapple tarts... huat ah! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh you managed to do the enclosed type, according to Wendy it is such a pain lol!
    Hope I am not too late to wish you Gong Xi Fa Cai:D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gong Xi Fa Cai to you and your family too. To me, making the enclosed type is easier :)

      Delete

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