Skip to main content
logo
Food Advertising by

Steamed Egg Custard



Steamed egg custard, Chinese style aka 'Ton Kai Tan' is one dessert that I'm extremely fond of.  Simple steamed egg custard, not too sweet, can be eaten warm or chilled  When it's warm, it's soft and smooth, once chilled, it's a  bit firm but just as delectable.

I remember that when I was little, the hawkers used to carry a pole on their shoulders and had a basket at each end and in each basket were  his products and other paraphernalia used for his sale.  The egg custards were sold warm as there was a small charcoal fire beneath the bowls of egg custard.

Eggs used to be a 'forbidden' food because the egg yolks have cholesterol in them and consuming them will raise cholesterol levels in our blood as well.  Now studies have shown that this theory is seriously flawed.  Eggs are a great source of protein and full vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K as well as iron, zinc and antioxidants.




see the marks where the knife has been inserted to test the custard




see the mini pandan/screwpine leaves, they are homegrown, don't misjudge them, tiny ones are more fragrant than those big fat ones




oops, better  snap another picture before the whole thing disappears into my tummy





Recipe for Steamed Egg Custard

Ingredients
3 eggs
320 ml water
60 gm rock sugar
3 to 4 slices young ginger
3 or 4 screwpine/pandan leaves

Preparation
Boil the water with the rock sugar, ginger slices and
pandan leaves till sugar dissolves
Let the syrup cool for about 10 mins.
Meanwhile, heat up a steamer,
once the water boils, lower to medium heat
Lightly beat the eggs and
add in the warm syrup, mix well
Strain the egg mixture into ramekins
Remove any foam from the mixture
Cover the ramekins with a piece of foil,
place them in the steamer
Steam over medium heat for about
20 to 25 minutes till custard is set
To test whether the custard is done,
insert a thin knife into the custard
The knife should come out clean.
Can be served warm or chilled




mmmm ....... heavenly, 'forbidden' food no more!

Comments

  1. mmmm....that's looks so soft, smooth and delicious. If I'm there, everything will end up in my stomach :P. I love egg custard.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a coincidence! I also thought of making this during the weekend. Yours look excellence silky smooth. I like eating it with brown sugar ginger syrup. Sounds like eating 'tofu hwa'! haha....

    ReplyDelete
  3. So smooth and looks so soft! I love it :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow! I can't believe how smooth and perfect you can make it look!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Simply Life
    Yes, must strain the egg mixture and remove any foam.

    penny
    When eaten warm it's softer, a bit like
    'tau fu far', chilled equally good.

    My Little Space
    Wonder how it'll look like with brown sugar syrup, maybe a darker yellow? Need to explore.

    Mary
    It'll be wonderful if you eat it hot on a cold day.

    ReplyDelete
  6. What a coincidence! I made some recently too! I have to try yours with ginger and pandan, nice flavours!

    ReplyDelete
  7. pigpigscorner
    Oh, would like to see your pics too. Thanks for dropping by.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Replies
    1. Sorry for late reply. This is Chinese version of steamed egg custard, but I suppose if you like milk, perhaps you can use half milk and half water. You can give it a try.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Thanks for dropping by. Please click on 'Anonymous' if you do not have a blog but do leave your name after the comment because I would like to know who you are.

Popular posts from this blog

Yam Puff ~ 'Wu Kok'

This is one of the must-have items whenever we go for have dim-sum ...... 'Wu Kok' or Yam dumplings.  Initially I had a hard time struggling with the soft and sticky dough in the hot and stuffy kitchen, but fortunately after chilling it in the fridge for 50 mins., it could be 'man-handled' quite easily!  Phew, not too bad as this is my first attempt!

Mixed Fruit Bread ~ 杂果面包

Homemade bread is always more nutritious than those bought from the supermarkets.  For one I don't add any bread improver or preservatives to my bread making.  Store bought ones may be fresh but they have loads of preservatives added to prolong their shelf life.  When I make bread I can control the ingredients that I want to put into my bread and I can customise the flavour and I find that kneading the dough can be quite therapeutic too! Mixed Fruit Bread  ~    杂果面包 Ingredients 290 gm high protein flour 10 gm wholemeal flour 30 gm sugar 3.1/2 tsp milk powder 18 gm butter (cubed) 1 tsp seasalt 100 gm dried mixed fruits (I used cranberries, sultanas and golden raisin) 1 whole egg beaten wtih 1/2 tsp water, for egg wash 1/8 to 1/4 tsp cinnamon  (optional) 2 tsp dry yeast             ) 170 ml warm water     )  Yeast mixture 1 Tbsp sugar               ) Method Add yeast and sugar to warm water, stir and let it set for about 5 to 8 mins. till foamy. In a mixing bowl of a stand mixer, add

Yoghurt Fruitcake

T is the festive season again and the all-time favourite for X'mas is undoubtedly the ubiquitous fruit cake.  This Yoghurt Fruitcake caught my eye when I was browsing through a Food and Travel magazine.  As I've never baked a fruit cake with yoghurt before, I was very eager to try.