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Mochi - 'Malaysian Monday no. 13'


I googled and stumbled upon this Mochi recipe that requires wheat starch and the method is slightly different from the norm.  As it looked pretty simple and easy enough, I set out to try as I've some wheat starch sitting in the pantry.  I could envisage a disaster looming when the dough was so wet and gluey and as there was excess glutinous rice flour, fortunately, I loaded in an extra 3 ounces before the dough became pliable enough to work with.  Phew ..... that was close!  Oh, you must be wondering what are those  'Bunga Telang' doing in the picture above.  For decor?  Yes, it was one of the ingredients that I used to make these Mochi, but alas, their bluish colour was not overpowering enough, hence the end result was Mochi with a very faint shade of grey!

Just a short introduction about these 'Bunga Telang' .... they do resemble the Morning Glory and while Bunga Telang is in Malay, it's Butterfly Pea ~ Clitoria Ternatea in English.  This is a perennial creeper, thrives well on moist soil and requires a lot of sunshine.  The colour from this flower acts as a natural blue dye or colouring for cakes and Malay kueh.  Do hop over to   'Wikipedia'    if you want to know more about this marvellous flower!




Instead of plain water, I used the water made from the  Bunga Telang, added in a knot of pandan/srewpine leaves, sugar and let it boil.
I couldn't take a picture when my hands were all gluey with the dough, but after adding in more glutinous rice flour, finally, yes finally managed to come up with this dough, a very faint tinge of grey.



Roll out the ball of dough, flatten and put in a ball of red bean paste in the centre.
Wrap up, pinch the sides and place seams down on a lightly oiled steaming tray, ready to be steamed.









My  efforts paid off and the reward was these sweet, chewy and yummy glutinous rice balls!

Ingredients
  • 1.1/4 cups of water
  • 2 oz sugar
  • 2 oz wheat starch
  • 13 oz glutinous rice flour
  • Some 'kao fun' or cooked glutinous rice flour  OR dessicated coconut for coating
Filling
  • 440 gm red bean paste or any other type of paste you fancy.  Weigh out 20 gm each and roll into a ball.
Method
  1. Boil the water with sugar till sugar is dissolved.  Let cool for a while.
  2. Sift in the wheat starch and glutinous rice flour, mix well.
  3. Lightly knead till the dough doesn't stick to the hands.
  4. Prepare a steamer with water boiling, and lightly oil a baking tray.
  5. Weigh out 50 gm of dough, roll out into a ball with the palm of your hands, flatten, make a shallow well in the centre and place in a ball of paste.
  6. Wrap up, shape into a ball and place seams down, an inch apart, onto the oiled baking tray.
  7. Steam under rapidly boiling water for 10 mins.
  8. Remove the steamed mochi from the tray with a spatula and immediately toss it into a bowl of  'kao fun' to coat.
  9. Place in paper cups and serve fresh.
  10. Makes 22 Mochi and they are best eaten on the day they are made.
To make Bunga Telang water
  1. I used 20 fresh  Bunga Telang, wash and soak them in 2 cups of boiling hot water.
  2. Cover and once cooled, leave in the refrigerator overnight.
  3. Next day discard the flowers and use accordingly.
  4. Added in some pandan/screwpine leaves and boil with the sugar till sugar is dissolved.




Do find out more from this   'site' .

Comments

  1. these mochi looks so yummylicious!!!

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  2. I planted some bunga telang this season but the flowers were not as blue as yours. I am not sure why but I kinda of suspect it might be the weather here. That is a nice edition touch in adding bunga telang to the syrup. This recipe is different from the one I always used. I have to try this out.

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  3. Nice mochi! I love mochi especially with peanut filling.

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  4. I have been searching for bunga telang without much success...just can't seem to find them here, sigh! Your mochi looks really soft and delicious!

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  5. omg, u actually extracted colours from a flower. I am so impressed! what other flowers can you do that to?

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  6. These are such speacial mochi! I wish I am able to get blue pea flowers here.

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  7. Cheah, Those mochi balls looks so pretty and yummy with matching Bunga Telang in the picture.
    I love the color of Bunga telan. Do you plant Bunga Telang at home?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow, homemade mochi! I have yet tried this. Must try it some day. I like how you make them. Much easier. lol! Thanks for sharing. Hope you're having a fabulous evening.
    Kristy

    ReplyDelete
  9. j3ss kitch3n
    Yes, soft and chewy!

    ICook4Fun
    Yes, must be the weather because this plant needs sunshine. This method is different, that's what prompted me to try.

    busygran
    Yes me too, especially if it's pandan flavoured!

    Jeannie
    I'm lucky because my immediate neighbour has planted this on her fence. A lot of early morning 'walkers' will always stop by to help themselves to the flowers!

    crustabakes
    Maybe the roselle flower? Not quite sure.

    3 hungry tummies
    Doubt we can bring in dried bunga telang into Australia.

    Anncoo
    My immediate neighbour has bunga telang creeping on her fence. So it's very convenient for me to pluck them as and when I need them. It serves the neighbourhood as well!!

    Kristy
    You are welcome and hope you have a pleasant evening too!

    ReplyDelete
  10. i have yet to try mochi, look at yoru beautiful mochi, i must try one day.

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  11. Wheat starch? Interesting, what does it do to it?

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  12. Delicious! I haven't made mochi for while....gotta get some glutinous rice flour from the Asia stores.

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  13. Yummy, I love these.
    There's a kuih stall(chain) in klang valley's shopping centers that sells a similiar kuih coated with coconut, called snow balls, I was so addicted to them.

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  14. Sonia
    Oh yes, please do!

    pigpigscorner
    Wheatstarch helps to give it a bit of a bounce and I find that this mochi tastes a bit different. It's soft, chewy and a wee bit bouncy. Best consumed on the day it's made.

    Angie
    Looking forward to your mochi posts!

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  15. Mochi looks wonderful and love the food styling with shell flowers..gorgeous!

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  16. Mmmm...my fvaourite. My children love them too. Cheah...you should turn that bitten one the other way round so that it looks like smiling....haha

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  17. Ananda
    I was trying my luck with the colour, but a bit disappointed that it didn't turn out more blue!

    Wendy
    Yup, I too find mochi addictive!

    MaryMoh
    Come to think of it, I should have done that, ha, ha!

    ReplyDelete
  18. believe it or not, i havent eaten mochi before though i see jusco is selling them. do they taste like 'tong yuen'? by the way, where did you get the fresh bunga telang?

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  19. lena
    Yup, ingredients are like for 'tong yuen, but taste different because 'tong yuen' is boiled, this one is steamed with the filling and there's another type where the glutinous rice flour is steamed, then the filling put in. The bunga telang was from my neighbour's fence, very convenient!

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  20. i seldom see people selling bunga telang in the market..yours are just too convenient, haha!!

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  21. Yum, I love mochi. Wish I could get that bunga telang easily, I want to make that pulut kuih, but I cannot even find the dried one here. Must try this mochi recipe, looks interesting with the wheat starch.

    Thanks again for being such an ardent supporter of Muhbbah Monday, we love having you on board.

    ReplyDelete
  22. lena
    You can't envy me more! Ha, ha!

    Shaz
    Even dried ones can't pass through the Aussie customs, what a pity! You are most welcome, if I can think of some recipes related to M'sia, I don't mind.

    ReplyDelete

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