Skip to main content
logo
Food Advertising by

Chrysanthemum Cooling Tea

Ipoh, besides boasting of its white, fatty beansprouts and smooth, soft Hor fun/Kway Teow used to be famous for its 'Leong Char' aka 'Cooling Tea'.  Actually, not so much the 'leong char',  but for the 'leong char mui' meaning 'cooling tea maiden'.

Back in the late '60's and early '70's there were many of these stalls set up by the roadside at night and they were manned by those pretty maidens, well you can say 'pretty maidens in a row'.  There was a great variety of cooling tea to choose from, 'loh hon kor', winter melon, sugar cane, chrysanthemum, not forgetting the very bitter, black as coffee, king of 'leong char', 'Wong Low Kat' , just to name a few.  They were cheap, those days, ranging from 20 to 50 sen per glass.

I remember that my mum used to make this concotion of 'Wong Low Kat' at least once a month and more frequently if the weather was unduly hot and dry.  Then me and my siblings were each 'served' with a rice bowl of this black stuff and a small tiny packet of sweet plum, 'Chan Pei Mui' as a sweetener.  My mum would then be hovering behind our backs with a cane in her hand.
We had a choice though, either we gulp down the black stuff all at one go and quickly toss the sweet plum into our mouths or slowly sip the black stuff and 'enjoy' the bitter taste........... delay tactics, and bite the sweet plum at intervals.  Whatever it is, she made doubly sure that every drop is consumed.

Today, made this 'Kook Far Leong Char' aka 'Chrysanthemum cooling tea', a refreshingly delicious, soothing drink, which can be taken at all times, throughout the year.





clockwise  .......  Chrysanthemum, Kam Choe/Liquorice, Yeong Sum Soo/Ginseng whiskers and Rock sugar


traditionally, Chrysanthemum has been used in Chinese medicine to treat fever, heatstroke and sore throat


Recipe for Chrysanthemum Cooling Tea

Ingredients

70 gm dried Chrysanthemum
10 gm Yeong Sum Soo
4 pieces Kam Choe/Liquorice
90 gm Rock Sugar
2.75 litre water

Method

Wash and rinse chrysanthemum a couple of times
to rid of dirt and grime thoroughly, then set aside
Bring to the boil the 2.75 litre of water
and once boiling, add in the
chrysanthemum
yeong sum soo
kam choe and
rock sugar
Cover the pot and let it simmer under low heat
for half an hour
when cooled, strain and
Serve




Comments

  1. This is a very nice drink & I cook it very often. My family likes it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for dropping by, Mary. Need to congratulate you on your being on Top 9, was busy with relatives over the weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Dad used to make this for me whenever I have a fever. I actually forgot the Chinese names for it. It's a good thing you wrote it down. This is surely a healing tea for everyone who has a lot of heat inside. Thanks for the wonderful information.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hey..this is what I will cook for the kids when they are back....sieve them and agar agar powder...yummy chrysanthemum jelly...try that...you will love it. Check this out :-
    http://elinluv.blogspot.com/2009/06/chrysanthemum-tea-jelly.html

    ReplyDelete
  5. Divina
    You are welcome. You can also add chrysanthemum
    into Chinese tea..it's called 'Kook Poh', meaning Chrysanthemum and Poh Lei, that's a type of Chinese tea leaves.

    Elin
    Ya, I saw your post on chrysanthemum jelly, looks very refreshing, will certainly try it.
    Thanks for reminding.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I made this very often too but I put more 'yangseng' less chrysanthemum. Still tasty good LOL!

    ReplyDelete
  7. What's 'yangseng'? Is it the ginseng roots? Maybe it's called differently in your part of the world. We need a lot of cooling tea here, more so if the weather is hot and dry.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi..!! Greetings from Singapore. I know that this is a really post but THANKS . I remember my grandmother making this for us when we were very young but these days, we've lost the patience to do simple things like this.

    I'll make this today but I'll use Winter Melon Strips (Tong Kwa) instead of Rock sugar.

    I'm gonna look through your blog and see what recipes you have over the years.

    Thanks again.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for dropping by. Please click on 'Anonymous' if you do not have a blog but do leave your name after the comment because I would like to know who you are.

Popular posts from this blog

Yoghurt Fruitcake

T is the festive season again and the all-time favourite for X'mas is undoubtedly the ubiquitous fruit cake.  This Yoghurt Fruitcake caught my eye when I was browsing through a Food and Travel magazine.  As I've never baked a fruit cake with yoghurt before, I was very eager to try. 

Ma lai Ko ~ 马拉糕

  Whenever we 'yum cha' in a Chinese dim sum restaurant we never fail to order and try their Ma Lai Ko, which is a brown sugar steamed fluffy sponge cake and what most kids would like to have.  I have been looking for a simple recipe to make this Ma Lai Ko.  Some recipes require a fermented starter dough which will result in streaky patterns in the Ma Lai Ko, some will just go with baking powder and sodium bicarbonate but I chance upon this recipe which requires yeast, baking powder and sodium bicarbonate. I made this on a cool, windy, day and was praying that the batter will rest and proof with bubbles after 2  hours and thankfully it did.  I was very pleased when the cake looked good after I opened the lid of my steamer and the taste was superb, not overly sweet and the texture, nice, soft and moist.  I kept the remaining pieces of 'ko' in a container, at room temperature and they stayed nice and moist even on the third day, maybe because the weather was cool and not

Prawn Omelette

This is a very simple and quick universal dish, common in most households.  It will certainly come in handy if you have unexpected guests who stay for dinner. Recipe for Prawn Omelette Ingredients 120 gm Prawns 2 Big Onions  -  sliced 3 Large Eggs 1 Teasp Light Soya Sauce Oil for frying Seasoning for Prawns 1/2  Teasp Salt 1  Teasp Sugar Dash of  Pepper Method Lightly beat up the eggs with the light soya sauce Heat up the pan with some oil Saute the sliced onions with the seasoned prawns Dish out Pour the beaten eggs onto the pan Add in the prawns and onions Once the bottom is brown, flip omelette and brown the other side Dish up and serve *****