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Fried 'Loh Shee Fun' ~ Rice noodles

Fried 'Loh Shee Fun' ....... 'Loh Shee' is rat in Cantonese.  I really don't have a clue how these noodles are linked to this name, perhaps the short noodles resemble the tail of the rat!  I'm just guessing, don't freak out!
If these noodles sound like Greek to you, do hop over to Wikipedia to read about these 'silver needle noodles' as they're called in Hong Kong.



These  noodles are a bit oily so that they won't stick to each other.  Hence when we fry them, we don't need to put in much oil.

I didn't add bean sprouts, instead I used quite a lot of choy sam.  Pale looking, no worries, just add in some more dark soya sauce,  colour to your personal preference.
  
These noodles are chewy and yummy and quite a number of kids like them.  Sprinkled in some fried garlic for added fragrance.

Ingredients
  • 500 gm loh shee fun
  • 150 gm pork fillet
  • 300 gm choy sam - cut into bite size lengths
  • 200 gm prawns 
  • 5 pips of garlic - chopped
  • Dark soya sauce, amount to your liking
  • Oil for frying
  • Salt/light soya sauce to taste
Marinade for pork fillet
  • 1 tsp each - light soya sauce, sugar, sesame oil
  • 1/2 tsp each - salt, dark soya sauce
  • Dash of pepper
Season the prawns with 1/2 tsp salt, sugar and a dash of pepper

Preparation
  1. Wash and cut up the choy sam, separate out the stems and the leaves.
  2. Saute the chopped garlic with some oil till fragrant, add in the pork fillet, stir-fry.
  3. Add in 1/2 cup water and when the meat is thoroughly cooked, toss in the choy sam stems, fry for a while, then the leaves, stir-fry.
  4. Toss in the noodles, stir-fry, make a small well in the centre and add in the prawns.  Continue frying and add in some dark soya sauce and a bit of sugar.  Add salt to taste.
  5. Dish out on plate and serve with chopped bird's eye chillies and light soya sauce.

Comments

  1. Cheah...you are adding salt to my wound. I was just talking about this noodles yesterday and craving for it and now you post this! Torturing to look at it! I think I want to pack my bag and go to your place now. You have to cook a BIG plate for me :D You must have the 6th sense to know my thoughts...haha

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  2. Loh Shi Fun dish looks good! I normally have it with soup!

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  3. Never had those, they look like beansprouts....;-) the stir-fry looks so good.

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  4. Mary, you are most welcome to share this with me. Great minds think alike!

    Pete
    They also taste good with soup.

    Angie
    Do hop over to Wikipedia to know more about this, just added this info to my blog.

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  5. One of my favourite noodles, my grandma said they look like rat's tail hence the name :)
    This dish looks so comforting!

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  6. I love this stir fried with bean sprout but my daughter loves it with soup. We're lucky beacuse we can now easily get this from the market!

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  7. ahhh... elin and i took rat noodles yesterday in woolley.. :)

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  8. Mee Tai Mak, or Loh Shi Fun - I like it! Sometimes I will order this as the "noodle" when I go to hawker center minced meat/fish ball noodle stalls :)

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  9. omg i love these noodles stir fried in soup ....wish i never saw the "loh shi" haha

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  10. lishapisa
    Dry or wet, they still taste good!

    ReplyDelete

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